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Shahid Amin

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Jun 26, 2020 | Shahid Amin

Covid-19: Gap between rich and poor

The covid-19 has shattered the daily routine, business, financial market and even the education system of the globe. This pandemic has severely affected the Indian academic fraternity. Academic fraternity is under an inexorable mental strain, which raises incidence and occurrence of tension, troubling and depression, owing to scrupulous steps of exclusion and closing in universities and schools.

The threat of infection is primarily high. The concern of family and friends is also intensifying the rising stress rate In addition, due to the lockdown dilemma and to the maintenance of social distance the authorities have instructed the teaching fraternity to take their classes online without providing them basic devices.

However, digital divide in the country was expected to turn online classes into a "operational nightmare". India, like every other country, is also witnessing a boom in e-learning. Zoom, WhatsApp and Skype classes are becoming the norm.

Yet the digital divide is growing greater as more schools are starting to embrace virtual tools. We 're hearing a lot about how learning is happening online, but for the simple reason that not everyone has access to a smartphone or internet it will be proven a disaster for poor.

Nearly millions of poor children in government and local school in India have no access to mobile phones, the internet, laptops or desktops, even though the most privileged students in private schools are taking classes online in the coronavirus lockdown.

With schooling scheduled to go online for at least a while, many parents who can't afford computers or wireless internet at home are concerned. Many are going out of the way to ensure that their children get the gadgets. The connection between income inequality among parents and the social mobility of their children is making the learning gap wider between rich and poor.

Teaching online is a strong forum but not for everyone. It does have some requirements, such as a decent internet access and an interface, but not every student can afford them. Lack of accreditation and low quality is another problem..Moreover, as their ability to remember and retain knowledge declines, students do not have access to online resources.

The provision of online classes on a regular basis also involves a cost aspect, since students have to pay for the costs of internet services. There is no communication yet from governments as to whether it will reimburse students or provide free or subsidized data packages. In the current situation, many students, particularly those whose families have lost their income as a result of a job loss due to lockdown, will not be able to afford this.

Suicide by a Kerala schoolgirl over not having access to a smartphone to attend online classes, stories of students in remote areas having to sit on the rooftops to catch the Internet, and siblings competing to get gadgets from their parents. These could be isolated cases of students struggling to attend online classes, but they reflect the wider challenge of "digital divide" across the country which could have a devastating impact on students as well as the enrolment numbers as those without digital access are at the risk of dropping out altogether, experts have warned. poor-family students tend to score far less on academic tests than their better-off peers.

The gap in achievement has grown over time: Today it is wider than it was 25 years ago. This is particularly worrying; as test scores are early indications of whether a child will go on to attend college and their adult income level.

In addition, the gap in academic achievement between the poorest students and those at the top of the income distribution is likely larger than many studies estimate. Lacking access to student income information, researchers and policy makers use a very crude yardstick to measure economic disadvantage. This makes it harder to ascertain the true extent of the gap and, more importantly, more difficult to target resources to those who need them the most.

Children with less educated parents and poor families suffer from higher levels of obesity, are experiencing more social and emotional difficulties and report poor or equitable health. And since they have been much poorer, they are unlikely to provide private preschools or the numerous possibilities for enhancement, extra lessons, tutors, music and art. In other words, even as one achievement gap narrowed, another opened wide. That kind of progress could dash one’s hope in the leveling power of education. We are all new to this version of remote learning, so we will all have to work harder to prevent a big learning gap between the rich and the poor

Many other countries hit by the Covid-19 outbreak, has closed schools and universities and prioritised online learning. But in a country where there is widespread poverty and some regions have no internet coverage at all, some students are locked out of virtual classrooms.

A teacher who works in a poor neighbourhood in India is not able to get in contact with his students since schools closed.

The first thing you need to sign up for is a mobile, laptop or computer.

On the other hand, there are families with smartphones at home, but they don't have an internet connection or have very limited internet access. Internet is a luxury for many families here, which they can't afford.

I know they 're poor and I can't push them to buy more internet packages, otherwise they'd have to cut some of their family's vital goods. While a computer would be preferable for online classes, a smartphone could also serve the purpose. However, the phone might be convenient for apps, but not for carrying out lengthy assignments or research. While 24% Indians own a smartphone, only 11% of households possess any type of computer, which could include desktop computers, laptops, notebooks, netbooks, palmtops or tablets.

Before any online program may expect to be successful, it must have students who can access the learning environment online. Lack of access whether for economic or logistical reasons will exclude students who are otherwise eligible for the course. This is a big concern in rural and in lower socioeconomic communities.

As far as connectivity to the Internet is concerned, it is not ubiquitous and in certain parts of our world, Internet access poses a substantial expense for the user. Some people pay their Internet access at a set monthly rate and others are paid with the time they spent online. If the time online for the participants is limited by the amount of internet access they can afford, then instruction and participation in the online program will not be fair to all students in the course. This is a restriction of online programs relying on Internet access.

Technology has the potential to improve learning outcomes and achieve universal quality education. But the digital divide (and the embedded gender divide) must be tackled to unleash its potential. Neither learning nor inclusiveness can have shortcuts. Our policy makers must address the fact that numerous students will be excluded from the online courses. Students in rural India or the poor population in urban centers have extreme difficulties in using these services, and we have no policy in place to address this. In a way, we 're just heading for an operational nightmare.

As majority of student population belongs to middle class and poor families so problem of limited resources and weak connectivity are quite observable therefore government must has to come up with a strategy to prevent a big learning gap between rich and poor. 

shahidamin3286@gmail.com

 

More From Author

Jun 26, 2020 | Shahid Amin

Covid-19: Gap between rich and poor

              

The covid-19 has shattered the daily routine, business, financial market and even the education system of the globe. This pandemic has severely affected the Indian academic fraternity. Academic fraternity is under an inexorable mental strain, which raises incidence and occurrence of tension, troubling and depression, owing to scrupulous steps of exclusion and closing in universities and schools.

The threat of infection is primarily high. The concern of family and friends is also intensifying the rising stress rate In addition, due to the lockdown dilemma and to the maintenance of social distance the authorities have instructed the teaching fraternity to take their classes online without providing them basic devices.

However, digital divide in the country was expected to turn online classes into a "operational nightmare". India, like every other country, is also witnessing a boom in e-learning. Zoom, WhatsApp and Skype classes are becoming the norm.

Yet the digital divide is growing greater as more schools are starting to embrace virtual tools. We 're hearing a lot about how learning is happening online, but for the simple reason that not everyone has access to a smartphone or internet it will be proven a disaster for poor.

Nearly millions of poor children in government and local school in India have no access to mobile phones, the internet, laptops or desktops, even though the most privileged students in private schools are taking classes online in the coronavirus lockdown.

With schooling scheduled to go online for at least a while, many parents who can't afford computers or wireless internet at home are concerned. Many are going out of the way to ensure that their children get the gadgets. The connection between income inequality among parents and the social mobility of their children is making the learning gap wider between rich and poor.

Teaching online is a strong forum but not for everyone. It does have some requirements, such as a decent internet access and an interface, but not every student can afford them. Lack of accreditation and low quality is another problem..Moreover, as their ability to remember and retain knowledge declines, students do not have access to online resources.

The provision of online classes on a regular basis also involves a cost aspect, since students have to pay for the costs of internet services. There is no communication yet from governments as to whether it will reimburse students or provide free or subsidized data packages. In the current situation, many students, particularly those whose families have lost their income as a result of a job loss due to lockdown, will not be able to afford this.

Suicide by a Kerala schoolgirl over not having access to a smartphone to attend online classes, stories of students in remote areas having to sit on the rooftops to catch the Internet, and siblings competing to get gadgets from their parents. These could be isolated cases of students struggling to attend online classes, but they reflect the wider challenge of "digital divide" across the country which could have a devastating impact on students as well as the enrolment numbers as those without digital access are at the risk of dropping out altogether, experts have warned. poor-family students tend to score far less on academic tests than their better-off peers.

The gap in achievement has grown over time: Today it is wider than it was 25 years ago. This is particularly worrying; as test scores are early indications of whether a child will go on to attend college and their adult income level.

In addition, the gap in academic achievement between the poorest students and those at the top of the income distribution is likely larger than many studies estimate. Lacking access to student income information, researchers and policy makers use a very crude yardstick to measure economic disadvantage. This makes it harder to ascertain the true extent of the gap and, more importantly, more difficult to target resources to those who need them the most.

Children with less educated parents and poor families suffer from higher levels of obesity, are experiencing more social and emotional difficulties and report poor or equitable health. And since they have been much poorer, they are unlikely to provide private preschools or the numerous possibilities for enhancement, extra lessons, tutors, music and art. In other words, even as one achievement gap narrowed, another opened wide. That kind of progress could dash one’s hope in the leveling power of education. We are all new to this version of remote learning, so we will all have to work harder to prevent a big learning gap between the rich and the poor

Many other countries hit by the Covid-19 outbreak, has closed schools and universities and prioritised online learning. But in a country where there is widespread poverty and some regions have no internet coverage at all, some students are locked out of virtual classrooms.

A teacher who works in a poor neighbourhood in India is not able to get in contact with his students since schools closed.

The first thing you need to sign up for is a mobile, laptop or computer.

On the other hand, there are families with smartphones at home, but they don't have an internet connection or have very limited internet access. Internet is a luxury for many families here, which they can't afford.

I know they 're poor and I can't push them to buy more internet packages, otherwise they'd have to cut some of their family's vital goods. While a computer would be preferable for online classes, a smartphone could also serve the purpose. However, the phone might be convenient for apps, but not for carrying out lengthy assignments or research. While 24% Indians own a smartphone, only 11% of households possess any type of computer, which could include desktop computers, laptops, notebooks, netbooks, palmtops or tablets.

Before any online program may expect to be successful, it must have students who can access the learning environment online. Lack of access whether for economic or logistical reasons will exclude students who are otherwise eligible for the course. This is a big concern in rural and in lower socioeconomic communities.

As far as connectivity to the Internet is concerned, it is not ubiquitous and in certain parts of our world, Internet access poses a substantial expense for the user. Some people pay their Internet access at a set monthly rate and others are paid with the time they spent online. If the time online for the participants is limited by the amount of internet access they can afford, then instruction and participation in the online program will not be fair to all students in the course. This is a restriction of online programs relying on Internet access.

Technology has the potential to improve learning outcomes and achieve universal quality education. But the digital divide (and the embedded gender divide) must be tackled to unleash its potential. Neither learning nor inclusiveness can have shortcuts. Our policy makers must address the fact that numerous students will be excluded from the online courses. Students in rural India or the poor population in urban centers have extreme difficulties in using these services, and we have no policy in place to address this. In a way, we 're just heading for an operational nightmare.

As majority of student population belongs to middle class and poor families so problem of limited resources and weak connectivity are quite observable therefore government must has to come up with a strategy to prevent a big learning gap between rich and poor. 

shahidamin3286@gmail.com

 

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